Guilt and Logistics

Jaunty

Guilt and Logistics

"What no one wants to accept—and no doubt there is an element of class prejudice at work here too—is that there are many ways to live a full, responsible, and even wise life that do not pass through reading literary fiction. And that consequently those of us who do pursue this habit, who feel that it enriches and illuminates us, are not in possession of an essential tool for self-realization or the key to protecting civilization from decadence and collapse. We are just a bunch of folks who for reasons of history and social conditioning have been blessed with a wonderful pursuit."



AIRETSO

AIRETSO

explore-blog:

Art, Inc. – a field guide to the psychology and practicalities of becoming a successful artist 

explore-blog:

Art, Inc. a field guide to the psychology and practicalities of becoming a successful artist 

Tempus fugit (at Pantheon, Rome)

Tempus fugit (at Pantheon, Rome)

senjukannon:

gloriousbacon:

Cyber-psychologist Berni Goode talking about Flow on Charlie Brooker’s How Videogames Changed the World.

Flow is extremely important. So, so important.
It’s what keeps some people sane. It’s what drives the world’s most skilled and accomplished athletes, the most intense gamers, the hardcore hobbyists, even many of the most talented artists, musicians and actors - flow is what you get when unstoppable drive meets an unflinching will and unlimited dedication.
Flow is being utterly, truly “in the zone”. And it’s one of the most amazing feelings there is. 
This is why finding a sport, or a hobby, or a martial art, or a handicraft, or a new video game, or any skill-based activity that uses focus and requires practice and repetition is so beneficial for things like depression and anxiety and overall mental/physical well-being.
Zoom Info
senjukannon:

gloriousbacon:

Cyber-psychologist Berni Goode talking about Flow on Charlie Brooker’s How Videogames Changed the World.

Flow is extremely important. So, so important.
It’s what keeps some people sane. It’s what drives the world’s most skilled and accomplished athletes, the most intense gamers, the hardcore hobbyists, even many of the most talented artists, musicians and actors - flow is what you get when unstoppable drive meets an unflinching will and unlimited dedication.
Flow is being utterly, truly “in the zone”. And it’s one of the most amazing feelings there is. 
This is why finding a sport, or a hobby, or a martial art, or a handicraft, or a new video game, or any skill-based activity that uses focus and requires practice and repetition is so beneficial for things like depression and anxiety and overall mental/physical well-being.
Zoom Info
senjukannon:

gloriousbacon:

Cyber-psychologist Berni Goode talking about Flow on Charlie Brooker’s How Videogames Changed the World.

Flow is extremely important. So, so important.
It’s what keeps some people sane. It’s what drives the world’s most skilled and accomplished athletes, the most intense gamers, the hardcore hobbyists, even many of the most talented artists, musicians and actors - flow is what you get when unstoppable drive meets an unflinching will and unlimited dedication.
Flow is being utterly, truly “in the zone”. And it’s one of the most amazing feelings there is. 
This is why finding a sport, or a hobby, or a martial art, or a handicraft, or a new video game, or any skill-based activity that uses focus and requires practice and repetition is so beneficial for things like depression and anxiety and overall mental/physical well-being.
Zoom Info
senjukannon:

gloriousbacon:

Cyber-psychologist Berni Goode talking about Flow on Charlie Brooker’s How Videogames Changed the World.

Flow is extremely important. So, so important.
It’s what keeps some people sane. It’s what drives the world’s most skilled and accomplished athletes, the most intense gamers, the hardcore hobbyists, even many of the most talented artists, musicians and actors - flow is what you get when unstoppable drive meets an unflinching will and unlimited dedication.
Flow is being utterly, truly “in the zone”. And it’s one of the most amazing feelings there is. 
This is why finding a sport, or a hobby, or a martial art, or a handicraft, or a new video game, or any skill-based activity that uses focus and requires practice and repetition is so beneficial for things like depression and anxiety and overall mental/physical well-being.
Zoom Info
senjukannon:

gloriousbacon:

Cyber-psychologist Berni Goode talking about Flow on Charlie Brooker’s How Videogames Changed the World.

Flow is extremely important. So, so important.
It’s what keeps some people sane. It’s what drives the world’s most skilled and accomplished athletes, the most intense gamers, the hardcore hobbyists, even many of the most talented artists, musicians and actors - flow is what you get when unstoppable drive meets an unflinching will and unlimited dedication.
Flow is being utterly, truly “in the zone”. And it’s one of the most amazing feelings there is. 
This is why finding a sport, or a hobby, or a martial art, or a handicraft, or a new video game, or any skill-based activity that uses focus and requires practice and repetition is so beneficial for things like depression and anxiety and overall mental/physical well-being.
Zoom Info
senjukannon:

gloriousbacon:

Cyber-psychologist Berni Goode talking about Flow on Charlie Brooker’s How Videogames Changed the World.

Flow is extremely important. So, so important.
It’s what keeps some people sane. It’s what drives the world’s most skilled and accomplished athletes, the most intense gamers, the hardcore hobbyists, even many of the most talented artists, musicians and actors - flow is what you get when unstoppable drive meets an unflinching will and unlimited dedication.
Flow is being utterly, truly “in the zone”. And it’s one of the most amazing feelings there is. 
This is why finding a sport, or a hobby, or a martial art, or a handicraft, or a new video game, or any skill-based activity that uses focus and requires practice and repetition is so beneficial for things like depression and anxiety and overall mental/physical well-being.
Zoom Info
senjukannon:

gloriousbacon:

Cyber-psychologist Berni Goode talking about Flow on Charlie Brooker’s How Videogames Changed the World.

Flow is extremely important. So, so important.
It’s what keeps some people sane. It’s what drives the world’s most skilled and accomplished athletes, the most intense gamers, the hardcore hobbyists, even many of the most talented artists, musicians and actors - flow is what you get when unstoppable drive meets an unflinching will and unlimited dedication.
Flow is being utterly, truly “in the zone”. And it’s one of the most amazing feelings there is. 
This is why finding a sport, or a hobby, or a martial art, or a handicraft, or a new video game, or any skill-based activity that uses focus and requires practice and repetition is so beneficial for things like depression and anxiety and overall mental/physical well-being.
Zoom Info
senjukannon:

gloriousbacon:

Cyber-psychologist Berni Goode talking about Flow on Charlie Brooker’s How Videogames Changed the World.

Flow is extremely important. So, so important.
It’s what keeps some people sane. It’s what drives the world’s most skilled and accomplished athletes, the most intense gamers, the hardcore hobbyists, even many of the most talented artists, musicians and actors - flow is what you get when unstoppable drive meets an unflinching will and unlimited dedication.
Flow is being utterly, truly “in the zone”. And it’s one of the most amazing feelings there is. 
This is why finding a sport, or a hobby, or a martial art, or a handicraft, or a new video game, or any skill-based activity that uses focus and requires practice and repetition is so beneficial for things like depression and anxiety and overall mental/physical well-being.
Zoom Info
senjukannon:

gloriousbacon:

Cyber-psychologist Berni Goode talking about Flow on Charlie Brooker’s How Videogames Changed the World.

Flow is extremely important. So, so important.
It’s what keeps some people sane. It’s what drives the world’s most skilled and accomplished athletes, the most intense gamers, the hardcore hobbyists, even many of the most talented artists, musicians and actors - flow is what you get when unstoppable drive meets an unflinching will and unlimited dedication.
Flow is being utterly, truly “in the zone”. And it’s one of the most amazing feelings there is. 
This is why finding a sport, or a hobby, or a martial art, or a handicraft, or a new video game, or any skill-based activity that uses focus and requires practice and repetition is so beneficial for things like depression and anxiety and overall mental/physical well-being.
Zoom Info

senjukannon:

gloriousbacon:

Cyber-psychologist Berni Goode talking about Flow on Charlie Brooker’s How Videogames Changed the World.

Flow is extremely important. So, so important.

It’s what keeps some people sane. It’s what drives the world’s most skilled and accomplished athletes, the most intense gamers, the hardcore hobbyists, even many of the most talented artists, musicians and actors - flow is what you get when unstoppable drive meets an unflinching will and unlimited dedication.

Flow is being utterly, truly “in the zone”. And it’s one of the most amazing feelings there is. 

This is why finding a sport, or a hobby, or a martial art, or a handicraft, or a new video game, or any skill-based activity that uses focus and requires practice and repetition is so beneficial for things like depression and anxiety and overall mental/physical well-being.

(Source: midnight-sarcasm)

design-is-fine:

Maurice Picard Verneuil, L’Animal dans la Décoration, 1897. Paris. The complete Prints via NYPL.
Zoom Info
design-is-fine:

Maurice Picard Verneuil, L’Animal dans la Décoration, 1897. Paris. The complete Prints via NYPL.
Zoom Info
design-is-fine:

Maurice Picard Verneuil, L’Animal dans la Décoration, 1897. Paris. The complete Prints via NYPL.
Zoom Info
design-is-fine:

Maurice Picard Verneuil, L’Animal dans la Décoration, 1897. Paris. The complete Prints via NYPL.
Zoom Info
design-is-fine:

Maurice Picard Verneuil, L’Animal dans la Décoration, 1897. Paris. The complete Prints via NYPL.
Zoom Info
design-is-fine:

Maurice Picard Verneuil, L’Animal dans la Décoration, 1897. Paris. The complete Prints via NYPL.
Zoom Info
design-is-fine:

Maurice Picard Verneuil, L’Animal dans la Décoration, 1897. Paris. The complete Prints via NYPL.
Zoom Info

design-is-fine:

Maurice Picard Verneuil, L’Animal dans la Décoration, 1897. Paris. The complete Prints via NYPL.

(Source: digitalgallery.nypl.org)

"Look closely. The beautiful may be small."



- Immanuel Kant



roadsandkingdoms:

Our friend and brilliant Japanese whisky correspondent Jim Frederick passed away suddenly at the age of 42 this week. He was loved by many, but here’s a brief remembrance from R&K’s Nathan Thornburgh:
In early 2003, when I was a barely-used TIME stringer in Seattle—the lowest cog in a very large machine—my girlfriend and I landed in Tokyo for the first time and met this man. He looked like a Japanese fantasy version of what a TIME Magazine Tokyo Bureau Chief should be: a giant blond hard-drinking Midwesterner, full of gossip and big stories. And he didn’t give a damn who I was or wasn’t, he was going to show us a good time. So he dragged us through highbrow and lowbrow Tokyo, introduced us to fascinating people, drank awamori and shochu and sake and god knows what else, and when Julia told the story of how her Nisei family had lost track of their Japanese relatives, Jim and his bureau-mate Toko Sekiguchi went to work on it and found a phone number for Julia’s long-lost relatives in southern Japan, whom we met on that same trip. I had never been treated so well by such impressive people.Jim used to make fun of me for telling that story the way I do. He seemed to think that anyone in his position would’ve done the same. But he was wrong about that. In the years to follow, as he became a rising star at TIME and wrote his brilliant book about the war in Iraq, I always remembered him as this: an uniquely good and generous man. It was so fair and right that he later found his perfect counterpart in Charlotte, and that they traveled the world together for an entire year and took gorgeous selfies from mountaintops and izakayas and churrasquerias. I don’t think Jim knew he was going to die. I think Jim was just very, very good at living.On Monday I’m flying to Tokyo again for more reporting, part of a winding career that Jim helped shape and encourage and improve every step of the way. And I’m going straight from Narita to drink with Toko and others who knew Jim like I did. You could land in any continent on earth and find friends of Jim’s who would raise a glass to his memory. I only wish we didn’t have to.
Please consider buying Black Hearts, Jim’s unbelievably searing bestseller about a troubled platoon in Iraq. The NY Times called it an “extraordinary book”, the Washington Post said it “demands to be read.” It’s as fine a legacy as any writer could hope to leave.

roadsandkingdoms:

Our friend and brilliant Japanese whisky correspondent Jim Frederick passed away suddenly at the age of 42 this week. He was loved by many, but here’s a brief remembrance from R&K’s Nathan Thornburgh:

In early 2003, when I was a barely-used TIME stringer in Seattle—the lowest cog in a very large machine—my girlfriend and I landed in Tokyo for the first time and met this man. He looked like a Japanese fantasy version of what a TIME Magazine Tokyo Bureau Chief should be: a giant blond hard-drinking Midwesterner, full of gossip and big stories. And he didn’t give a damn who I was or wasn’t, he was going to show us a good time. So he dragged us through highbrow and lowbrow Tokyo, introduced us to fascinating people, drank awamori and shochu and sake and god knows what else, and when Julia told the story of how her Nisei family had lost track of their Japanese relatives, Jim and his bureau-mate Toko Sekiguchi went to work on it and found a phone number for Julia’s long-lost relatives in southern Japan, whom we met on that same trip. I had never been treated so well by such impressive people.

Jim used to make fun of me for telling that story the way I do. He seemed to think that anyone in his position would’ve done the same. But he was wrong about that. In the years to follow, as he became a rising star at TIME and wrote his brilliant book about the war in Iraq, I always remembered him as this: an uniquely good and generous man. 

It was so fair and right that he later found his perfect counterpart in Charlotte, and that they traveled the world together for an entire year and took gorgeous selfies from mountaintops and izakayas and churrasquerias. I don’t think Jim knew he was going to die. I think Jim was just very, very good at living.

On Monday I’m flying to Tokyo again for more reporting, part of a winding career that Jim helped shape and encourage and improve every step of the way. And I’m going straight from Narita to drink with Toko and others who knew Jim like I did. You could land in any continent on earth and find friends of Jim’s who would raise a glass to his memory. I only wish we didn’t have to.

Please consider buying Black Hearts, Jim’s unbelievably searing bestseller about a troubled platoon in Iraq. The NY Times called it an “extraordinary book”, the Washington Post said it “demands to be read.” It’s as fine a legacy as any writer could hope to leave.

erikkwakkel:

Shark with Napoleon hat
Meet a medieval shark with a hat on. However, there is much more to this funny 13th-century decoration. Medieval decorators often got it wrong when they drew exotic animals like this. Elephants, for example, looked like pigs with big ears. We can’t blame the artists, as they had never seen these animals, which lived far away - and they had no internet or means to travel that far. This is why the image of the shark is so special: it is realistic. It shows its gills, the row of pointy teeth that stick out, and the typical round opening near the tip of the nose. In sum, this decorator had likely seen a shark in real life. For the book historian this is interesting as it may help localize where the book was made. Given that it was produced in France, we may potentially place its production near the ocean, or perhaps even in the south of the country, near the Mediterranean. All that from a bunch of pointy teeth - and some healthy guess work.
Pic: Paris, Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève, MS 98.

erikkwakkel:

Shark with Napoleon hat

Meet a medieval shark with a hat on. However, there is much more to this funny 13th-century decoration. Medieval decorators often got it wrong when they drew exotic animals like this. Elephants, for example, looked like pigs with big ears. We can’t blame the artists, as they had never seen these animals, which lived far away - and they had no internet or means to travel that far. This is why the image of the shark is so special: it is realistic. It shows its gills, the row of pointy teeth that stick out, and the typical round opening near the tip of the nose. In sum, this decorator had likely seen a shark in real life. For the book historian this is interesting as it may help localize where the book was made. Given that it was produced in France, we may potentially place its production near the ocean, or perhaps even in the south of the country, near the Mediterranean. All that from a bunch of pointy teeth - and some healthy guess work.

Pic: Paris, Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève, MS 98.